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Professor Manville Returns to UCLA

August 16th, 2016|Comments Off on Professor Manville Returns to UCLA

MANVILLE It is with great excitement that the  UCLA Lewis Center welcomes Mike  Manville back to UCLA Luskin as an  assistant professor of Urban Planning.  Professor Manville received both his  MA and PhD in urban planning from  UCLA in 2003 and 2009 respectively  and afterward served as a post-doctoral  researcher with the Lewis Center.  Professor Manville is coming to UCLA  from the Department of City and  Regional Planning at Cornell University  where he taught courses on traffic  congestion, urban public finance, and  spatial economics from 2011-2016.

 Professor Manville specializes in two  main areas of research: the relationship between transportation and land use, and local public finance. On the first point, […]

A drop in driving, a suburban millennial, and a Lyft Line (DTLA Forum, Part 1)

May 17th, 2016|Comments Off on A drop in driving, a suburban millennial, and a Lyft Line (DTLA Forum, Part 1)

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Can we be confident about the future of public transit, both in Los Angeles and around the nation? On April 27, UCLA’s Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies and Institute of Transportation Studies convened professors, policymakers, and administrators to answer this question at the 9th annual UCLA Downtown Los Angeles Forum on Transportation, Land Use, and the Environment. Los Angeles hasn’t had a problem building transit recently, with two major light-rail extensions opening in 2016 alone. But in his opening remarks, ITS Director Brian Taylor noted that “If you build it, they will come” isn’t cutting it anymore. What transit agencies need to ask is, “What happens after you build it?” […]

If you’ve seen one transit agency, you’ve seen one transit agency (DTLA Forum, Part 2)

May 16th, 2016|Comments Off on If you’ve seen one transit agency, you’ve seen one transit agency (DTLA Forum, Part 2)

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If the first part of the “Future of Transit” conference was about cutting-edge research on travel trends and behavior, the next was all about hearing from practitioners about what has worked, what hasn’t, and what is ahead for the industry. The second panel of the day featured representatives from three transit agencies with very different constituencies and challenges. First up was Kurt Luhrsen, VP of Planning for the Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County, Texas. The Houston region is famous for its sprawl and car culture, but Luhrsen had an inspiring story to tell about a successful redesign of that city’s bus network.

As Houston has opened a number of new light […]

Women Making Moves: Gender and the Changing Landscape of Transportation

April 20th, 2016|Comments Off on Women Making Moves: Gender and the Changing Landscape of Transportation

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(More photos below the article and on Google Photos).

In March, women’s history month, the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs and the UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies convened Women Making Moves: Gender and the Changing Nature of Transportation to celebrate the rise of strong women in the transportation field in Los Angeles, and to elevate the voices of three rising leaders: Lisa Schweitzer (UP Ph.D. ’04), Assistant Professor at the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy, Tamika Butler, Executive Director of the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition, and Chanda Singh (M.A. UP ‘10), Policy Analyst at the Los Angeles County […]

Urban Goods Movement Lecture Series: Genevieve Giuliano

April 18th, 2016|Comments Off on Urban Goods Movement Lecture Series: Genevieve Giuliano

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(see more photos and Dr. Giuliano’s slides below) 

Dr. Genevieve Giuliano, this year’s Perloff Speaker, gave a lecture titled, “Spatial Dynamics of the Logistics Industry in California Metropolitan Areas.” This lecture was also part of the Urban Goods Movement Lecture Series, organized by the Lewis Center in partnership with the Community Scholars Program and Center, the UCLA Department of Urban Planning, Labor Occupational Safety & Health Program (LOSH), Downtown Labor Center, Center for Occupational and Environmental Health (COEH), Institute of Transportation Studies, and Institute for Research on Labor and Employment (IRLE).

Although dealing with urban sprawl has been an enduring urban planning problem, much less attention has been paid to “logistics sprawl,” which is the […]

Lecture Series: Urban Goods Movement

March 24th, 2016|Comments Off on Lecture Series: Urban Goods Movement

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How is the goods movement industry shaping transportation and land use in our region? What are the environmental and economic consequences of goods movement, and what are the implications for pollution and human health, jobs and wages? These questions and more are the subject of our lecture series, which comprises five lectures this winter and spring.

The Urban Goods Movement lecture series is supported by a happy coincidence of circumstances. This year the Harvey Perloff Professorship at the Department of Urban Planning in the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs is held by Dr. Genevieve Giuliano, noted urban planner and economist. Dr. Giuliano has excelled at bringing to the field of urban […]

Book Launch: The Rise and Fall of Urban Economies

February 16th, 2016|Comments Off on Book Launch: The Rise and Fall of Urban Economies

UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs Professor Michael Storper gave a talk on his recently-published book, The Rise and Fall of Urban Economies. It explores reasons why, over the past 40 years, the economic standings of California’s two largest urban regions, Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area, have diverged so considerably. In terms of traditional economic theory, divergence is a surprise that requires explanation, and the story of Los Angeles serves as a natural experiment of history akin to the ones explored in Guns, Germs and Steel by UCLA Professor of Geography Jared Diamond.

In the 1970s, Los Angeles and San Francisco stood on relatively equal footing in terms of per capita income as two top-tier cities in the […]

  • A Screenshot of the REVISION Application.

Lewis Center & SCAG Launch Regional Data Analysis & Visualization Application

January 8th, 2016|Comments Off on Lewis Center & SCAG Launch Regional Data Analysis & Visualization Application

Southern California is in a perpetual state of change.  In recent years, regional planners have sought to focus growth near existing jobs and transit, in areas where people drive less for commutes and have more transportation options.  

REVISION is a new web application dedicated to understanding community change in Southern California.  With a range of metrics related to accessibility, livability, employment, and health, REVISION helps both professional planners and stakeholders without a technical background monitor the progress of the region’s Sustainable Communities Strategy, a plan to improve environmental sustainability, social equity, and public health.  Users can use the site to answer hundreds of questions about regional and neighborhood change, including:

UCLA Partners with Caltrans to Deliver California Transportation Planning Conference

December 2nd, 2015|Comments Off on UCLA Partners with Caltrans to Deliver California Transportation Planning Conference

This week, 200 attendees meet in Downtown Los Angeles to discuss the future of transportation planning in California

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The last time Caltrans hosted a statewide transportation planning conference, in 2008, transportation in California was very different. Fastforwarding a short seven years later, California is hosting the first cap-and-trade system in the U.S., all of the state’s regions have Sustainable Communities Strategies linking transportation and land use, and public health at the center of the conversation. These changes, among others, are what bring together over 200 transportation professionals to the 2015 California Transportation Planning Conference hosted in Downtown Los Angeles December 2 through 4.

The […]

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Refocusing Planning: The Mainstreaming of Public Health and Environmental Goals

November 24th, 2015|Comments Off on Refocusing Planning: The Mainstreaming of Public Health and Environmental Goals

California is a national and international climate action leader. In 2015, the state further charted its course towards an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. The state is pursuing a series of reforms to transportation planning in order to hit that long-term target.

However, California is also on the leading edges of impacts from climate change. Drought has fundamentally changed a state that has so long depended on imported water and being America’s fruit, vegetable, and nut basket. As public health becomes a national focus, local agencies must respond by incorporating elements of health in their planning and design.

Our three Arrowhead Symposium panelists discussed aspects of water, transit access, and public health reminding […]

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